Reflecting on Japanese Internment during World War II

This event has passed.
Start:
April 25 @ 4:30 pm
End:
April 26 @ 1:00 pm
Cost:
Please visit our website for cost details.
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Contact:
The Program in the Humanities and Human Values
Phone:
919-962-1544
human@unc.edu
Venue:
Chapel Hill
Room:
Address:
Chapel Hill, NC 27599 United States
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Featuring PlayMakers Repertory Company’s PRC2 production of Hold These Truths

Japanese internment camps have long been a subject of controversy.  Over one hundred thousand Japanese men, women, and children—the majority of whom were American citizens—were removed from their hometowns across the American West and relocated to camps under the watchful eye of the government. No other suspect group, no German or Italian-Americans, faced such ethnic profiling and discrimination during the war. Many complicated issues arose from this extralegal act by the US government. How would Japanese-American men react to the military draft? What did internment and exclusion mean for mixed-race couples? What happened to Japanese-American families and communities as a result of the detention? We’ll address these questions in conjunction with the PlayMakers Repertory Company’s PRC2 production of Jeanne Sakata’s critically acclaimed play, Hold These Truths, inspired by the life of Gordon Hirabayashi who defied the internment order all the way to the Supreme Court.  This weekend will provide an opportunity to discuss the balance between security and freedom—a balance we’re still seeking.

Topics & Speakers

Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II
Eric L. Muller, Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law in Jurisprudence and Ethics

The Racially Ambiguous Story of Yoshiko deLeon and the Mixed Marriage Policy of 1942
Jennifer Ho, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature

The Breakdown of Family: Individual Japanese Americans During and Post-World War II
Heidi Kim, Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Japanese Internment and the False Dichotomy of Security and Freedom
A panel discussion with our speakers

Please note: The seminar will break at 6:00 p.m. on Friday to allow participants to attend the Friday evening performance of Hold These Truths.


More Info: http://humanities.unc.edu/programs/adventures-in-ideas/japaneseinternment/